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sticky

Sticky is an app paired with trackers to help people with low vision safely locate items in public spaces and at home. Features include a voice assistant to help locate items faster and simpler, a visual compass to display more detailed coordination, AR Scanner to help identify specific items, and settings to adjust text size.  

DURATION

6 weeks, Feb 2021 - Mar 2021

TEAM

Joanne Chen, Yuna Shin, Joyce Lin, Meron Solomon

CONTRIBUTION

Ideation, Usability testing, Wireframing, User interface, Design system, Hi-Fi prototype, Illustrations, Storyboarding

design challenge

How might we create a more inclusive process to locate lost or misplaced objects in both private and public locations for people with low-vision?

contextual inquiry

To start, my team was interested in the topic of location tracking, specifically for items. We started by doing competitive analysis to identify the current competition, focusing on the strength and weakness. Through the research, we were able to gain strategic insights into the features, functions, and flows designed by other tracking devices app and identify an underserved market as our target user.

EXISTING SOLUTIONS

Strengths

Each use sound and directions to help users locate items. Users can keep track of several items. The option to share item location with friends and family.

Weaknesses

Limited options for locating items (ring sound and map directions). Broad navigation directions that exclude low vision users. Fail to provide users with the exact location of their items.

DESIGN PRINCIPLES

Adaptable

The solution is aware of the variety of users that uses the product. Provide multiple methods of interaction for potential mismatches. 

Assistive

Provide anticipatory alerts, notifications, and updates on items that are at risk of being lost. Present tools and methods for the user to resolve issue at hand that are non-invasive and easily achievable.  


Convenient

The product seamlessly fits into the routines and lifestyles of our users. It easily provides ways to ease the anxiety and stress that arises when items are misplaced or lose their items.

interview insights

To better understand and gain empathy for our target group, we proceeded in conducting interviews with general and low vision users to gain insight into the daily struggles of locating lost items, their current method of finding the object, and more.

personas

After gaining insights from our participants, we created personas to make sure we are creating the product with the specific users in mind while considering the others that might be excluded.

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Primary

Jo, 21 year-old, college student

+ Jo is a college student with low-vision who loses everyday items regularly.

+ Needs an accessible way to quickly pinpoint where she misplaced items in both at home and in public spaces.

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Secondary

Susan, 65 year-old, retired

+ Due to her age, Susan is forgetful and has low-vision.

 

+ Needs assistance with locating and notifying her of misplaced items on a daily basis.

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Secondary

Cam, 35 year-old, working mom

+ Working mom with multiple daily responsibilities & often is looking for misplaced items.

+ Needs a streamlined process for locating her child’s belongings and remembering items before leaving the house.

initial design

Next, we started to create user flows to define the features that would be included in our app and also build out the main flows of activating a new tracker, locating an item with the camera, and housemate notification. 

usability testing

With the built-out wireframes, we conducted the first round of usability testing with multiple users to reveal areas of confusion and uncover opportunities to improve the overall user experience. We gained some key insights through it and made design changes based on the experience our participants had.

KEY INSIGHTS

(Audio) navigation needs to be more accessible for low vision and spectrum of usable eyesight.

Directions displayed must be dynamic and relative to the position of the user at all times.

Sending alerts about lost objects must be flexible and consider a variety of exceptions and alternative use cases.

Optimizing UX for the linearity of voiceover, and not just for UI.

DESIGN CHANGES

Included haptic and audio feedback to support navigation.


Added a compass to support visual navigation.

Included the option to set reminders for specific items and alerts for forgotten items in public spaces.

Emphasizing voice assistant capabilities and shortcuts.

iterations

These are the main changes we made to our app after the testing. It includes creating additional features to support easy navigation to the item, a more customized way to be notified of missing items, a clearer hierarchy of our dashboard, and emphasizing the voice assistant capabilities.